Archive

stories

The Truth of Fact, the Truth of Feeling by Ted Chiang — Subterranean Press

https://web.archive.org/web/20140222103103/http://subterraneanpress.com/magazine/fall_2013/the_truth_of_fact_the_truth_of_feeling_by_ted_chiang

“People are made of stories. Our memories are not the impartial accumulation of every second we’ve lived; they’re the narrative that we assembled out of selected moments. Which is why, even when we’ve experienced the same events as other individuals, we never constructed identical narratives: the criteria used for selecting moments were different for each of us, and a reflection of our personalities. Each of us noticed the details that caught our attention and remembered what was important to us, and the narratives we built shaped our personalities in turn.”

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Tonight’s Sisters in Crime meeting had a ‘writers block’ exercise: take 3 different images and write a story based on them in 10 minutes.

My three photos were all from a small town in Greenland:

  • A picture of a hotdog stand owned by a man from Denmark
  • A group of girls dancing traditional Greenland dances
  • A view of the town’s small fishing port

My results have kind of a Grendel vibe to it, and a noir aspect courtesy of reading some French noir fiction recently:

Tired of his bridge, the Danish troll opened a hot dog stand. Right near the port where tourists came to eat hot dogs and watch traditional dances.

His mother, who still lived in the water of the port, stole crabs and fish from the fishermen, and children from the tourists.

One day, he ran out of hot dogs.

He called to his mother in ancient Trollish: “I need one of your children.”

“No, I’ve eaten the last one. Get your own!”

No threat to any of this year’s Pulitzer Prize winners, but fun. And having fun writing certainly makes dealing with writers block easier!

Where the Water Tastes Like Wine review: Finding truths through myth and legend | PCWorld

https://www.pcworld.com/article/3258830/gaming/where-the-water-tastes-like-wine-review.html

Hear stories, tell your own, hear how your stories come back to you as retold by others. And experience how the American mythos formed and is reforming.

Fascinating and makes me want to subscribe to Steam to get it.

More games like this, please, Steam!

SurLaLune Fairy Tales is a good reminder that real fairytales are dark and dangerous, meant for adults. Not Disney’s weak, watered-down kid stuff.

SurLaLune Fairy Tales features 49 annotated fairy tales, including their histories, similar tales across cultures, modern interpretations and over 1,500 illustrations. Also discover over 1,600 folktales & fairy tales from around the world in more than 40 full-text Books.