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After reading Northanger Abbey, it is either a steaming pile of Victorian lust, backstabbing and betrayal …

Or a tempest in teapot with a rushed “shit, gotta wrap it all up right now!” ending.

Can’t decide which, but leaning toward the teapot.

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Where the Water Tastes Like Wine review: Finding truths through myth and legend | PCWorld

https://www.pcworld.com/article/3258830/gaming/where-the-water-tastes-like-wine-review.html

Hear stories, tell your own, hear how your stories come back to you as retold by others. And experience how the American mythos formed and is reforming.

Fascinating and makes me want to subscribe to Steam to get it.

More games like this, please, Steam!

After the tight focus of the other stories, this one feels sprawling. And sloppy: SWAT, Swat, swat – three different renderings of the same acronym? Yes.
It starts with a man murdered using a tako spear, apparently because his wife brought home the wrong picture from her Wine and Canvas event. Apparently the picture she brought home was actually a clue to a conspiracy by a large militant Native Hawaiian group (led by the obligatory evil maniac) to take over the state. Even at the end, when the maniac is caught, we’re told that this group has its deadly secret tentacles everywhere throughout the islands.

Nothing new here, with a strong trace of racism to it. And hypocrisy, since it was white American business men conspiring with the captain of a US Navy vessel in Pearl Harbor who took over the sovereign Kingdom of Hawaii using force. I regard this story as the usual “because we (white colonialists) are violent thieves that take things that belong to others, EVERYONE ELSE IS OUT TO DO THE SAME THING TO US!”

Bah. I didn’t particularly enjoy it. Not just for the racism, but also for the weak plotting and so-so characters. I might award this the booby prize as the worst story in the book.

Perhaps you’ll like it, anyway, so go buy your copy of the anthology, read it, and let me know what you think in the comments.

In this one, the author a character, or at least bears the author’s name. The author likes to incorporate herself and her real boyfriend into her stories, so how much of the characters’ behavior and lives are real and how much are fictional? That adds a bit of fun to it.

The narrator is a chiropractor who’s also a master of Shaolin Temple Kung Fu. (Isn’t every chiropractor these days?) His girlfriend (who bears the author’s name) is a palmist. He prefers logical, scientific thinking, she prefers mystical thinking.

A new patient (referred by his girlfriend) dies of a drug overdose in his adjusting room. Turns out the heroin she was using was poisoned. The police visit his girlfriend’s home, and find a baggie of poisoned heroin taped underneath the girlfriends table after she was visited by a notorious drug dealer named Asian Ace. (That strangely enough, the police don’t seem to know what he looks like?)

The whole ‘scientific vs mystic’ thing is pretty simpleminded. If palmistry and such things are your thing, you’ll enjoy this story quite a bit. (Since she’s writing the story, you can guess which side “wins”.)

The story builds to a climax in which Asian Ace is set to poison the girlfriend as the chiropractor races to save her. To find out IF or how he saves her, buy your copy of Dark Paradise: Mysteries in the Land of Aloha, and find out.